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Progressive Cities Weigh Free Public Transit Amid Rising Costs

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☆ Urban Transit Now Considered A Basic Human Right

Progressive lawmakers across the U.S. say mobility is a human right and want their residents to be able to freely move around their cities, no matter their income.

Michelle Wu, a City Council member in Boston, wants everyone to ride for free on subways and buses that crisscross the region. Wu says the city is experiencing a “transportation crisis” as ridership declines, rush-hour traffic rises and the infrastructure of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority continues to crumble.

Michelle Wu

The transportation authority needs salvation and money for repairs, commuters and local transit advocates say, but instead of raising fares beyond the $2.90 it costs now if you pay for a subway ride in cash, Wu thinks a solution may lie in dropping fares altogether.

Her position is shared by other progressive lawmakers across the country who say mobility is a human right, like health care and education, and think residents should be able to freely move around their cities, no matter their income brackets. They propose eliminating fares on city buses, light rail and trains to achieve their vision of universal mobility. But some experts warn that free rides wouldn’t solve the issues besetting many public transit systems, including crumbling infrastructure, infrequent and unreliable service, and routes that take workers nowhere near their jobs.

Kansas City, Missouri, could become the first major city to eliminate bus fares in June under a proposal in the budget the City Council is expected to approve by the end of March.

Mayor Quinton Lucas said scrapping the $1.50 bus fare would be a windfall for working-class families that spend a good part of their incomes on transportation, and he believes it would benefit the city’s economy, allowing people to move around more easily and patronize local businesses.

“Making transit free makes more job opportunities accessible for more people,” Lucas said. “We’re a car-based city, so if you don’t have a car or bus fare, you don’t get to where you need to be.”

The city would lose $8 million a year on fare-free transit, but Lucas insisted that it would not be “a significant amount” of Kansas City’s $1.7 billion budget. By not paying for maintaining and using a fare collection system, the city would save about $3 million a year, leaving Kansas City officials to come up with only $5 million to cover losses, Lucas said.

He said critics rarely ask where the money comes from for other projects, like the hundreds of millions of dollars spent each year on building and maintaining streets or the $325 million to renovate Arrowhead Stadium, where the Kansas City Chiefs play.

“That costs us and local government tens of millions of dollars a year,” he said. “So I think the real question people have to ask is ‘Do we care about the public?'”

Robbie Makinen, CEO of the Kansas City Area Transportation Authority, said public transit is the glue that holds a community together.

“The return on investment for social justice, compassion and empathy far outweighs the return on investment for asphalt and concrete,” he said.

The Kansas City transit authority partnered with the Center for Economic Information at the University of Missouri-Kansas City to analyze the economic impact of the proposed zero-fare policy. The study found that free transit would increase Kansas City’s regional gross domestic product by more than $13 million a year and improve the livelihoods of regular riders along with new riders encouraged to try public transit without the fare barrier.

“For those living paycheck to paycheck, as most Americans are, even an additional $50 (the cost of a monthly bus pass) per month of income can make the difference in deciding which bills to pay,” the study said.

Kansas City has embarked on similar but smaller experiments before. In 2017, it made transit free for veterans and the next year for ninth- to 12th-graders in four major school districts.

While advocates have championed the move, they say fare-free policies aren’t enough if transit isn’t accessible.

STORY CONTINUES @ SOURCE:

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/do-we-care-about-public-cities-weigh-free-public-transit-n1137561